A Civil Society Organisation under the aegis of LYNX Nigeria has said that over 33.5 per cent of girls between ages 11 and 14 in the country had not received any form of schooling while over 67 per cent of girls in the northern part of the country were out of school.
The civil society therefore called on Nigerians to create safe spaces for the education and overall development of the girl-child.
Mr. Babarinde Ayokunnu, National Programme Officer of the organisation dropped the hints on friday in Lokoja at a National Consultative Draft Meeting to introduce and review the National Curriculum on “Safe Space for the Girl-child”.
Ayokunnu noted that the organisation, Linking the Youths of Nigeria through Exchange, LYNX, was of the conviction that only in Safe environment could the girl-child develop and attain relevance in the society.
He said that there were identified gaps in the implementation of the current curriculum of the Safe Space, saying that the review was aimed at articulating inputs from various states to evolve a harmonised or unified curriculum for the country.
Ayokunnu stresses further that the unified curriculum was expected to address critical gaps and emphasise some non-negotiable elements especially in the education and other aspects of overall development of the girl-child.
He pointed out that over 33.5 per cent of girls between ages 11 and 14 in the country had not received any form of schooling while over 67 per cent of girls in the northern part of the country were out of school.
Also speaking, Mr Victor Adejoh, Facilitator of the programme said the girl-child issue had assumed a national dimension as girls were being faced with a lot of challenges by reason of where they found themselves.
Adejoh said that the programme was being held at states’ level as the states had their peculiarities.
He added that issues of girl ownership, role models, friendship and community buy-in, how to make a space safe, ensuring girls’ physical security among others were being thrashed.
Also speaking Mrs Bridget Okpanachi-Shelika observed that girls were “very secretive” and urged parents to build relationships based on trust with their children especially the girl-child to enable them confide in their mothers, issues affecting them.
Mrs. Sikiratu Bello, Secretary, Kogi chapter of National Council of Women Societies, NCWS, urged stakeholders to take the safe space message to schools, churches, mosques and the public in the interim.
Mr. Mathias Okpanachi attributed the gaps in the implementation of the Safe Space for the girl-child to poor moral values rather than material poverty and called for a renaissance to restore the dignity and confidence of the girl child.


Ad:See How you can turn $500 into $10,000 Click HERE For Details.
SHARE