A REPORT from the United
Nations Children’s Fund,
UNICEF and World Health
Organization, WHO report
in collaboration with Global
Breastfeeding Collective
Initiative, has shown that
an investment of $4.70 in
breastfeeding per newborn
could generate $300 billion in
economic gains for countries
by 2025.
According to The Global
Breastfeeding Scorecard,
released in Abuja at the start of
the 2017 World Breastfeeding
Week, WBFW, in Nigeria
alongside a new analysis
revealed that an annual
investment of only US$4.70
per in newborns is required
to increase the global rate of
exclusive breastfeeding among
children under six months to
50 per cent by 2025.
The Global Breastfeeding
Scorecard, which evaluated
194 nations, revealed that only
40 per cent of children younger
than six months are breastfed
exclusively, that is given
nothing but breast milk and
only 23 countries have exclusive
breastfeeding rates above 60 per
cent.
Director-General of WHO, Dr.
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus
said,“ “Breastfeeding gives
babies the best possible start
in life, Breastmilk works like a
baby’s first vaccine, protecting
infants from potentially deadly
diseases and giving them all
the nourishment they need to
survive and thrive.”
Also UNICEF Executive
Director, Anthony Lake, said
that Breastfeeding is one of
the most effective – and cost
effective – investments nations
can make in the health of their
youngest members and the
future health of their economies
and societies.’’
“By failing to invest in
breastfeeding, we are failing
mothers and their babies – and
paying a double price: in lost
lives and in lost opportunity,
Lake noted.
Evidence shows that
breastfeeding has cognitive and
health benefits for both infants
and their mothers. It is especially
critical during the first six
months of life, helping prevent
diarrhoea and pneumonia, two
major causes of death in infants.
Mothers who breastfeed have
a reduced risk of ovarian and
breast cancer, two leading causes
of death among women.
According to UNICEF Fact
Sheet, breastfeeding benefits
not only individual children
and families, but also the
entire economy, adding that
investment framework by
World Bank for nutrition notes
that every dollar s invested
in promoting breastfeeding
can generate a return of $35 in
economic benefits.
Meanwhile, the National
Health Strategic Survey, 2015 shows that in Nigeria only
25% of babies benefit exclusive
breastfeeding in the first six
months of life.
UNICEF Report shows that at
least 5.4 million Nigerian children
each year miss out on benefits of
exclusive breastfeeding which
contributes to chronic child
malnutrition.
Wife of the President, and
Nutrition Ambassador,
Mrs Aisha Buhari called on
employers to give more support
to breastfeeding by creating an
enabling environment such as
breastfeeding rooms for mothers.
Evidence shows that
breastfeeding has cognitive and
health benefits for both infants
and their mothers. It is especially
critical during the first six
months of life, helping prevent
diarrhoea and pneumonia, two
major causes of death in infants.
Mothers who breastfeed have
a reduced risk of ovarian and
breast cancer, two leading causes
of death among women.

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