Federal Ministry of Health is working on an Emergency Medical Service, EMS policy, to institutionalise emergency medical provisions in Nigeria, Minister of Health, Dr. Khaliru Alhassan, has said.
According to a press statement from the Ministry, signed by Deputy Director Press and Public relations, Mr. Clement Egbeama, made available to Nigerian Pilot, yesterday in Abuja, the Minister made the announcement at a Rally, organised by the Health Ministry in conjunction with Federal Road Safety Corps to mark the 3rd UN Global Road Safety Week (4th-10thMay, 2015), in Abuja.
The theme of this year’s event is ‘children and Road Safety’.
In his keynote address, Dr. Alhassan who was represented by the Director, Trauma Emergency and Disaster Response, Federal Ministry of Health, Dr. Joseph Amedu, lamented that Road Traffic Crashes, RTCs is ranked among the 4 major killers of children over age 5years with over 500 children killed and many more injured on the world’s Roads daily.
He explained that children are vulnerable to road crashes because of their size, lack of judgemental ability and peer influence. He also said that most children who die in RTCs are pedestrians and occupants of vehicles that do not use seat belts or child restraints.
In his words, Dr. Alhassan said that ‘children do not have to die or be injured on our roads because these crashes are avoidable’. He further stressed that ‘Parents should be at the forefront of child Road safety.
Speaking earlier, the Corps Marshal and Chief Executive, Federal Road Safety Corps, represented by Deputy Corps Marshal, DCM Adei A. Abu said that this year’s UN Road Safety Week seeks to highlight the plight of children on roads and to generate action to enhance their safety. The week will feature hundreds of events to be hosted by governments, international Agencies, Civil society Organizations , Private companies and the delivery of the ‘’ Child Declaration for Road Safety’’ to policy-makers worldwide, the DCM added.


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